Japanese Titles/Honorifics!

chiisai_hana

-nipah!
Retired
kami-sama means god
laugh.gif
 

jul10

-mokyu
Retired
QUOTE (chiisai_hana @ Aug 01 2006, 09:58 PM) kami-sama means god
laugh.gif

lolz,
ohmy.gif
I'm a disgraced of anime fans. I really heard that VERY often, but how come i forget it...
huh.gif
then, the only question left is kikei....
rolleyes.gif
 

Bold

-kenja sama
Retired

windfinder

-san
Kouhai
The difference between dono and sama (as explained to me) is that sama belittles the one who says it and raises the one who is targeted. This is why you see people being "forced" to say sama, and it makes them angry. Dono does not, on the other hand, have this "belittling" factor.
 

hamasusuke

-aniue
Retired
QUOTE (windfinder @ Aug 03 2006, 04:15 PM) The difference between dono and sama (as explained to me) is that sama belittles the one who says it and raises the one who is targeted. This is why you see people being "forced" to say sama, and it makes them angry. Dono does not, on the other hand, have this "belittling" factor.
hmm.... i couldn't tell if that was either told in a singular or just a biased idea..... but i never assumed the belittlement.... that kinda brings up the kouhai/sempai idea up.

hmm... i haven't seen anything related to what you just said... well not in anime at least.
 

windfinder

-san
Kouhai
QUOTE (hamasusuke @ Aug 04 2006, 01:43 AM) hmm.... i couldn't tell if that was either told in a singular or just a biased idea..... but i never assumed the belittlement.... that kinda brings up the kouhai/sempai idea up.
It was actually a fansub's groups' note to the viewer, because the jokes they were cracking in the anime weren't funny unless you understood the character's desire NOT too call someone sama. However, I doubt the term belittles the user too much, otherwise it wouldn't be used so much in common speech (my basis for which is anime).
I equate it to calling someone your lord in a society where there aren't lords. (both in meaning, and in resultant social position in terms of language. AKA: Calling someone your "lord" today shows an anachronistic and demeaning relationship in a society that (generally) values equality.
 

Byproduct

-dono
Kouhai
QUOTE I was told in class (by Japanese teachers) that we can romanize it either way. Sometimes it'll sound more like 'm' and others like 'n', but it's the same Japanese character and that's all that matters.

That's very true. Also the pronouncation from what I understand also comes from where one lived. The dialect, I guess is what I'm trying to say. One from the Kanto regon would nomrally use seNpai and near Okinawa seMpai. In my opinion, it doesn't really matter. It's what you're comfotable with.
 

Roninnico

-chi
Kouhai
QUOTE (Bold @ Jun 26 2006, 11:45 PM)
But it does not mean that Dono is above Sama. It is preatty much equivalent in politeness, but used un different circumstance.

Sorry just to add to the dono/sama debate, Bold pretty much already said it but i thought i'd elaborate; I believe dono is a phonetic change from the word 'tono' or lord (i.e. Tanaka-dono is Lord Tanaka), where as sama is simply a form of deep respect, so in some cases sama may be higher than dono or sometimes lower and they may even be used interchangebly. Just thought i'd add that
smile.gif
 

Bold

-kenja sama
Retired
QUOTE (Kit-Tsukasa @ Aug 20 2006, 01:31 PM) i think i may be wrong, but oni-san is more formal, polite and respectful when said while ni-san sounds more casual or "street-talk," but they still mean the same thing regardless.
I think you are corect. ni-san is mostly used by a sibling talking to his older brother directly. oni-san is more respectfull and used to refer to the older when talking ABOUT him to someone else.
 

hamasusuke

-aniue
Retired
yeah, basically it. ni-san would still be used as if you were "real" siblings (the ones that fight once in a while). same thing with ni-sama, only that's as respectul as oni-san, but not quite.

if you want the best example of this being used, they sometimes use it in tsubasa chronicles, where the variance applies to different situations.
 

DarkSkyLady

-moeagaru-loli
Retired
I wanted to know whether you add the -chan, -sama, etc. or do you get them on your name after a certain amount of posts. Cause I want one at the end of mine but i don't think you can alter your name on here. Can someone let me know.
 

Bold

-kenja sama
Retired
QUOTE (DarkSkyLady @ Aug 22 2006, 01:24 AM) I wanted to know whether you add the -chan, -sama, etc. or do you get them on your name after a certain amount of posts. Cause I want one at the end of mine but i don't think you can alter your name on here. Can someone let me know.
Chi, San, Chan, Donoa and Sama are given automticly based on your activity as a member. This is based on the number of posts and a few other factors like length of post, time since joined, number of posts per day, etc

Basicly the systems prevents a super spammer from getting a sama title in a week!

Custom tiltes are also available for older members that have been around for long.
 

warita200

Tai Youkai
Sempai
I would like to add something to this ni-san oni-san debate. If you will pay attention carefully, you will notice, that japanese use the O in front of lots of words and it basically shows politeness, good language or something in that way. For example when you ask for tea, you say: Ochaa, not just chaa, because that wouldnt be polite. Japanese use it a lot, when talking in high level Japanese!

What I think is interesting or rather annoying is how the siblings always call each other nee-san/nii-san. I mean, they do have a name, right? If somebody kept calling me nee-san all the time, I would have to strangle him. And another interesting notion is, that in Japanese they dont have a plain word for brother/sister. Either you are nee-san, or imoto..... but there is nothing neutral. Even twins must be distinguished by age. I think that is really weird.
blink.gif
 

hamasusuke

-aniue
Retired
true that there is no neutral form for the brother/sister form. however in the traditional form of japanese, they don't always refer to age. they refer to placement in group of people.

Say, for example, you were in trouble most of the time, and i came by and helped you every time, and i'm about the same age as you. Later on you'd try refering me as your "older" brother, or sworn brother in some cases. The reason is because people have the idea of big brothers always being there for them, and that is why the titles have adapted to that type of situation. so in the end, you could be older than i am by 6 months and you'd still call me aniki because i'm always there for you.
 

Ausdoerrt

-sama
Retired
Ni-san and Oni-san, as much as I know, are almost the same thing. There is also Onii-chan, which is a reference to an older brother by a younger sister. Also, "Oni" is more often used by females, and "ni" bymales. Which means, guys, if you call your brother "onii-chan", the Japanese will think you're weird
laugh.gif

Well, at least this is what I got from anime and chats with one of my Asian friends...
 
Playasia - Play-Asia.com: Online Shopping for Digital Codes, Video Games, Toys, Music, Electronics & more
Top